City Hall Plans New Dumpsites
Posted On : December, 22, 2015 | By សំឡេងទីក្រុង

source: Khmertimeskh.com | December 21, 2015

With the Dangkor dumpsite straining to take on further large amounts of garbage in the capital, City Hall plans to set up two new dumpsites in Chroy Chongva and Char Ampov districts, according to the Phnom Penh governor.
Pa Socheatvong, Phnom Penh municipal governor, posted on his Facebook page Sunday that it was clear to City Hall from an inspection of the Dangkor dumpsite in Dangkor district that the site is running out of space, as Phnom Penh continues to generate increasing amounts of garbage.
“To solve this problem, City Hall is now considering two new sites for waste storage, in Chroy Chongva and Chbar Ampov districts, in order to prevent garbage collection delays and avoid causing traffic jams or accidents in the city,” said Mr. Socheatvong.
The two new dumpsite are planned for 2017 and would help with delivery of garbage on the other side of the city’s bridges since both the districts are located on the other side of the river, said Ieng Aunny, deputy governor.
According to an Asia Foundation study, over the past six years, more than 3 million tons of garbage have been deposited at the Dangkor dumpsite. In 2015, an average of 2,000 tons of garbage per day was transported to the dumpsite – 54 percent of it food rubbish, 18.1 percent of it plastic bags, 6 percent of it paper, 0.2 percent of it rubber and leather and the remainder comprising grass, wood, iron and fabrics.
“The Dangkor dumpsite is full … but we’ll still be able to store waste there for another two or three years and what we’re planning now is where will be most convenient for two more sites”, Mr. Aunny said.
San Chey, a coordinator of the Affiliated Network for Social Accountability in East Asia and the Pacific (ANSA-EAP) told Khmer Times that a promising study by City Hall included evaluations of the safety of possible new sites and solutions to cope with any risks that were ascertained.
“We’ve seen the problems related to residents in the area of the Dangkor dumpsite,” said Mr. Chey. “They are living among viruses in an environment lacking protection and infected by insects, with water leaking from the trash. I think City Hall needs to find ways to prevent this and make the new dumpsites safer.”
The Dangkor dumpsite occupies 31 hectares of land near the Phnom Penh’s Khmer Rouge-era Killing Fields and several hundred waste collectors live close by, making a small living by seeking out anything valuable in the rising mountain of toxic trash.

Urban Voice Cambodia

Urban Voice Cambodia